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Barn Becomes Well Insulated Education Center

Recently the Narrow Gate Foundation reached out to The Hayes Company in Nashville, TN with a challenge. They had a barn that they use as an education center and it was in need of insulation. The Narrow Gate Foundation provides training for international men in sawmill operation, woodworking craftsmanship, best business practices, and Christian ethics so these men can return to their home countries with business skills that help build their local economies.

The Hayes Company in Nashville, TN was honored and eager to help so we came up with an insulation recommendation. The Narrow Gate Foundation did not have framing in the barn’s ceiling so there was no accessibility for traditional fiberglass to be used in the ceiling. Because of this, spray foam insulation was the perfect option to maintain a comfortable temperature. The walls were already professionally framed, so our recommendation was to install fiberglass in the walls.

Spray foam insulation was installed in the ceiling and it looks incredible. The next step is to install fiberglass insulation in the walls to complete the insulation project. Once complete, the education center will be a comfortable, conditioned space to support the mission of the Narrow Gate Foundation.

crawl space encapsulation

What is the best method for finishing a crawl space?

Crawl space conditioning can be overlooked during home construction. Crawl spaces in new homes are commonly finished with basic insulation. Proper crawl space encapsulation can have a big effect on the energy efficiency and air quality of your home.

Crawl spaces are susceptible to dampness partly due to the moisture from the soil seeping into the crawl space. Moisture can attract unwanted pests and the contaminated air can flow up into your living spaces. The best solution is crawl space encapsulation which is a two-step process that combines proper insulation and air sealing. First a vapor barrier is installed, then spray foam is added along the crawl space walls to add R-value and seal any air leaks. Crawl space encapsulation results in a healthier indoor living space, lower energy consumption and a dry storage area.

If you notice that your floors are cold during winter months, your crawl space may need more insulation. Or if your home was built before 1990 there may be no insulation at all.

If you have questions about adding insulation to your home’s crawl space, our Nashville professionals can answer your questions.

 

crawl space encapsulation

How to know if crawl space insulation needs to be replaced

The insulation in your crawl space may need to be replaced as your home ages. Some signs that your crawl space insulation may need replacement are:

  • Utility bills on the rise. If your home’s energy consumption increases, it is time to check your crawl space insulation.
  • Interior temperatures change. If your home is warmer than usual in the summer and colder in the winter, the temperature variation may be due to poor insulation in your crawl space.
  • Traces of pests. If you notice signs of pests in your crawl space, it is time have your crawl space evaluated and consider crawl space encapsulation.
  • Wet insulation. Damp or moist insulation can result in mold and mildew and needs to be replaced. Even if it fully dries, the spores can remain.

Crawl space encapsulation is one of the best ways to protect your home’s structure from moisture, and protect your family from mold and pests. Call our professionals at The Hayes Company in Nashville to ask about replacing your crawl space insulation.

 

installing batt insulation

What is batt insulation?

Batt insulation (also known as blanket insulation) comes in flat pieces. It is made of fiberglass or mineral wool which is pre-cut into flat pieces. Batt insulation is an inexpensive way to insulate your home. Some batt insulation comes with a foil or paper (kraft) facing and some comes with no facing. The need for facing is determined by your climate and whether you need a vapor barrier in the area of your home you are insulating.

Batt insulation is typically installed between the studs, rafters and joists of your home and can be used to insulate walls, floors, attics and ceilings. Batt is very flexible so it can be fit into framing to reduce heat transfer and help reduce energy bills. Batt insulation comes in a variety of R-values and can be layered for additional R-value. Batt remains effective over time because it does not settle and it can also help with sound dampening.

Batt insulation must be installed and fitted correctly for maximum effectiveness. Call The Hayes Company in Kansas City to determine if batt insulation is the best choice for your project.

installing gas fireplace

How to install gas fireplaces

Gas fireplaces are a popular choice and can add a warm atmosphere to your home. Because they do not need to be replenished during use, they can be easier to use than a wood burning fireplace. They come in many beautiful styles and can be conveniently operated by a wall switch or remote control. The most common style of gas fireplace is a direct-vent log fireplace which can be vented horizontally.

Before installing a gas fireplace, select the location in your home and measure to be sure it will fit. You will also need to place the gas fireplace on an elevated surface for safety. Next a ventilation point needs to be cut in your wall or ceiling and pass-through piping is installed. A professional will need to be hired if a new gas line needs to be installed.

If you do not want to add a hole for ventilation you may want to consider a vent-free gas fireplace which does not require a flue or an electric fireplace.

Our technicians at The Hayes Company are highly trained in correct gas fireplace installation techniques. Call us today!

cleaning glass shower door

How to clean glass shower doors

The best way to keep your glass shower doors clean is to prevent the water from drying and causing mineral buildup. For a quick clean and to stay ahead of mineral build up, keep a squeegee handy. Use it to clean the glass after each shower.

There will still be times when your shower glass needs to be cleaned. You can clean your shower glass by saturating it with a spray bottle of white vinegar. Let the vinegar soak for a few minutes (longer for tougher buildup) then scrub the glass with a plastic bristle brush or a sponge dipped in baking soda. Do not use metal brushes or scouring pads because they may scratch the glass. Then rinse the glass doors with cold water and dry with a microfiber cloth or soft absorbent towel.

You can also purchase a commercial cleaner containing phosphoric acid to clean the mineral deposits from your glass shower doors. If your home has hard water, installing a water softener is another option that will lessen the mineral buildup on the shower glass.

If you are looking for the perfect shower door for your home call The Hayes Company. We will travel to your home, take measurements and give you our expert advice.

Where To Invest - Insulation Or Windows?

Insulation or Windows? Where to Invest

When thinking of a home upgrade that will increase energy efficiency, homeowners typically consider two projects: insulation or windows.

There is a lot of confusion about which investment provides a better return on investment.

Building envelope

Your home’s envelope consists of the walls, floor and roof. When considering the total square footage of your home’s envelope, windows make up a very small portion of it. By investing in upgrading the energy efficiency of your home’s attic and walls (more square footage), you’ll be maximizing energy efficiency across a greater portion of your home’s envelope and you will see a greater energy benefit.

Heat flow
Air inside a home naturally flows from ground to sky. A home loses 70% of energy through the attic and roof – far more than is lost through windows or doors. Upgrading attic insulation keeps the air you’ve paid to heat in your home. Adding air sealing further prevents conditioned air from seeping out around areas like ducts and attics.

R-value
R-value is a measure of the amount of heat flow a certain product resists. The higher the R-value, the better it reduces heat flow. The R-value of windows can vary based on the number of panes, air space between panes, etc. Double pane windows have an R-value of 1.5 to 2. Upgrading insulation to current code would result in attic R-value of R-30 to R-38 in Kansas City. When you consider the difference in R-value and the natural heat flow in a home, it’s easy to see how a fresh blanket of insulation is a great investment.

Cost
When looking at bottom line, the choice is clear. According to Home Advisor the average cost to upgrade windows in the Kansas City area is $4,064. The same report shows the average cost to upgrade insulation in the Kansas City area is $1,295. When you look at how much home insulation costs, the cost of home insulation is more affordable than the cost of windows.

Ready to add insulation to your attic? Contact us to schedule your free estimate.
Someone In Your Home Suffers From Allergies

Suffering from Allergies? Air Seal Your Home!

When winter begins to fade, thoughts of warm days and green grass are welcome. If you suffer from allergies, spring brings many symptoms that can make the season hard to bear.

If you or someone in your home suffers from allergies, air sealing your home is one way to keep pollen, dust and other irritants out of your home (not to mention it can make your home more comfortable).

A home’s envelope has many penetration points that allow air to enter and exit the home. These penetration points can be around areas like duct work and chimney chases and exist between building materials (studs, framing, etc.). As a home naturally breathes, outside air is drawn into the home’s interior. This natural process draws outside pollen, dust and other irritants into your home’s inside air.

Sealing air leaks helps keep outside air and pollutants from entering your home. In addition to reducing interior allergens, air sealing your home has other benefits:

  • More comfortable living environment. Air infiltration can contribute to problems with moisture, dust, and the entry of pests. Sealing air leaks can help maintain your indoor comfort.
  • Reduced energy bills. Sealing air leaks keeps conditioned air inside your home. This means your HVAC system will do less work to maintain your home’s internal temperature, which can reduce your energy bills.
  • Quieter home. Air leaks also allow outside noise to infiltrate your home. Sealing these leaks helps keep out noise and results in a quieter home.

Interested in air sealing? Contact or call us today for a free Air Sealing estimate!

Basement Rim Joists And Box Sills

Looking to Save Money on Energy Bills? Check Your Basement

For most homes, basement rim joists and box sills are a major source of energy loss. These areas are located around the perimeter of the basement ceiling where the walls of the home meet the foundation.

This is one of the thinnest points in a home’s exterior, which allows outside air to easily leak into the basement. This area is also a convenient way for pests to enter a home. Spiders, bugs and other creatures can easily find their way into your home through residual penetration points around HVAC, electrical and plumbing along the basement ceiling.

Spray foam is an ideal product to insulate and air seal your home’s rim joists and box sills. Spray foam insulation is a two-in-one product that both seals air leaks and insulates – and it goes beyond what a homeowner can do on their own.

Insulating and air sealing your rim joists and box sills will make your basement (and entire home) more comfortable, help block out pests and aid in reducing your energy bills. Contact us to schedule your free estimate!

Tips for Attic Insulation

What You Need to Know About Attic Insulation

When it comes to home insulation, the first area that comes to mind is the attic. Building airflow moves from ground to sky, naturally pulling conditioned indoor air up and out of a structure. Proper attic insulation helps keep conditioned air inside your home and helps keep your home more comfortable. When conditioned air remains inside your home it helps reduce wear and tear on your heating system and keeps energy bills in line. How to install insulation in an attic depends upon many factors. With different insulating options, it’s important to hire an experienced insulation contractor so you are sure they know how to install insulation to gain maximum insulating benefit.

There are three common methods used to insulate attics – blown-in fiberglass, blown-in fiberglass with air sealing and spray foam insulation. Here’s what you need to know about each:

BLOWN-IN FIBERGLASS

Insulating attics with blown-in fiberglass insulation is a quick and easy way to add R-value. This is a basic method of attic insulation and a cost effective option to upgrade attics of existing homes or insulate attics in new homes. Properly knowing how to blow in insulation can make a difference in how the insulation performs. The product must be evenly installed across the attic space to ensure even and proper insulating of the home.

BLOWN-IN FIBERGLASS WITH AIR SEALING

Combining blown-in fiberglass insulation with air sealing dramatically increases a home’s energy efficiency. This method helps keep conditioned air inside the home and adds R-value. In an existing home, attic insulation is removed and penetration points around the attic floor are sealed. After air sealing is complete, a fresh blanket of blown-in fiberglass insulation is installed. In a new home, penetration points around the attic floor are sealed before blown-in insulation is installed.

SPRAY FOAM INSULATION

Installing spray foam insulation in the attic of a new or existing home provides optimal energy protection. In an existing home, insulation is removed from the attic and spray foam is installed along the roofline. In a new home, spray foam insulation is installed along the roofline as part of the construction process.

Proper attic insulation combined with air sealing is one of the most cost effective ways to save money on monthly energy bills. Wondering if your home could benefit from additional attic insulation? Ready to discuss insulation for your new home project? Contact our office today!